2014 In Summary

This has been a great year. Despite some various health issues I’ve been dealing with, I’ve managed to add some iconic photographs to my collection from Texas, Arizona, Utah, and Oregon.  It’s going to be tough to beat all the incredible landscapes, sunrises, and sunsets I’ve seen this year.

Here’s the rundown:

Roughly 8000 exposures.

17 website releases (a few photographs from this year have made appearances at shows but have not been released on the website).

3 shooting companions (My wife Abbie – East and South Texas and Oregon, my good friend Jeff – West Texas, and my Dad – Arizona and Utah).

1 new massive printer.

75 new canvases printed and stretched. Some stretched more than once. I cautiously consider myself an expert canvas stretcher now.

2 new photography students.

1 rattlesnake encounter.

1 slightly unstable canoe ride.

 

What were your favorite photographs this year?

The third most popular photograph slot is a three-way tie between Aspen Reflections, Moonset over Santa Elena, and Tree On Mount Scott.

Aspen Refections

Aspen Refections

 

Moonset Over Santa Elena

Moonset Over Santa Elena

treeonmountscott_500

Tree On Mount Scott

 

The #2 spot is held by Pumpjacks, which was #1 last year.

Pumpjacks

Pumpjacks

And sitting comfortably in the #1 spot as the most popular photograph of the year is…. *drumroll*

Starry Cypress!

Starry Cypress

Starry Cypress

I look forward to 2015 and all the awesome things that I hope to see, capture, and create artwork with. Thank you for your support and I look forward to serving you and your art collecting, home/office decorating, and gift giving needs.

– Tim Herschbach

How the Camera “Sees”

I am often asked at art shows if I “enhance” or “manipulate”.  If you’ve read my previous posts on this topic, you’ll know that I am first and foremost an artist. My #1 priority is to create a beautiful print.  I love to change the photographs!  My second priority is to give the viewer the feeling of being there. I want you to have a similar impression when you view my work as I had when I was standing there in the freezing cold, witnessing the perfect moment in person.  The problem is that the camera (among other limitations) does not know my vision and it cannot make necessary changes to accomplish this.

I want you to see the difference between a raw capture, which is what the camera’s sensor actually records, compared side-by-side to the final photograph after I’ve made my changes.  Here is Aspen Reflections as it was captured by the camera.

Aspen Reflections, raw capture

Aspen Reflections, raw capture

And here is the final version:

Aspen Reflections, final version

Aspen Reflections, final version

Changes made:

Cropping, leveling, stretching, contrast increase, removing the power line, removing the floating debris spots, increasing saturation in some areas, decreasing saturation in others, sharpening, lens distortion correction, lens vignette correction, levels adjustments, white balance.

The first image is what the camera captured, but it is not what it was like to stand there and look at these beautiful colors.  The final image is.